Hook loop

Hook loop

The lifting loops are one of the very important topics thatoccurs when crocheting. There are many questions! In the lesson:, we have already examined the performance of different loops in height, but at the same time made the edge even. Nevertheless, many needlewomen have questions on the subject of calculating the ups and when they are considered as a column, and when they are performed as an additional element. We deal with these insidious lifting loops! ? If in the description you encountered lifting loops that run to the top of the last column of the previous row, then the lifting loops are executed as an additional element and they are not taken into account when counting the columns. It can also be designated as: skipping the lifting loops and tying the column into the loop the base under the lifting loops. On the diagram this will look like this: crochet lifting loops are not counted for a column In the case where the first column of the knitrow is performed at the top of the penultimate column of the previous row, the lifting loops are counted as 1 column. In other words, we skip the lifting loops, loop the base under the lifting loops and tie the bar into the next loop. Schematically this can be displayed as follows: crochet lifting loops are counted for a column From row to row in one canvas the way of counting andperforming lifting loops does not change. Such a simple trick will help you to more easily cope with reading schemes and counting columns. Stay up to date! First find out about new articles!

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